Drink that soda at your own risk

Newsflash!  An excess of soda in your daily diet is bad for you.

Well, yes, of course all of us already knew and could appreciate this concept before today.  But did you ever really take the time to comprehend what it really means?

soda

Well, how about this?  Soda makes you fat – and a new study released by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy confirms it.

For a look at all of the data released by the CHPR & CCPHA in conjunction with their study of California adults and adolescents, Bubbling Over: Soda Consumption and Its Link to Obesity in California, click here.  

As for the highlights, consider this:

Research shows that over the last 30 years Americans consumed 278 more calories per day even as physical activity levels remained relatively unchanged. One of the biggest changes in diet during that period was the enormous increase in soda consumption, accounting for as much as 43 percent of all new calories.

Researchers found that adults who drink a soda or more per day are 27 percent more likely to be overweight than those who do not drink sodas, regardless of income or ethnicity. Among children, the study found that 40 percent of young children (2-11 years of age) are drinking at least one soda or sugar-sweetened beverage every day. Adolescents (12-17) represent the biggest consumers, with 62 percent(over 2 million youths) drinking one or more sodas every day.

And then there’s this:

13% of 12-to-17-year-olds drink three or more sodas on a daily basis.

And this:

62% of adults who drink soda daily are overweight or obese.

It is a stunning look at behaviors of normal consumers who have been pummeled with advertising and options (over 450 varieties of soda now available on the market) over the last 30 years.

One of the study’s authors, CCHPA Executive Director Dr. Harold Goldstein, concludes it succintly by noting: “The science is clear and conclusive: soda is fueling California’s $41 billion a year obesity epidemic. We drink soda like water. But unlike water, soda serves up a whopping 17 teaspoons of sugar in every 20-ounce serving.”

As noted by the report’s lead author, UCLA research scientist Susan Babey, as astounding as the statistics are, the results likely understate the calorie count of the average Californian’s beverage consumption as the survey did not include sugary sports drinks like Gatorade.

Predictably, the American Beverage Association has issued a statement decrying the results of the study and claiming that it “does not demonstrate cause and effect”.

Well, how’s this for cause and effect?  This study has caused me to seriously reconsider the necessity to drink soda at all and the effect is that my minimal consumption will continue trending downward.

If you have good reasons to keep consuming sodas and sweetened beverages, by all means, go for it.  But at least think about grabbing a bottle of water or a glass of low-fat milk the next time you’re thirsty.  Your waistline will most certainly thank you.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to Ma.gnoliaAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Advertisements

~ by acm213 on September 17, 2009.

One Response to “Drink that soda at your own risk”

  1. This study is outrageous…debunked easily by my research:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/business/worldbusiness/07iht-soda.4832472.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: